Suggested Reading List for Readers
Aged 14 to 15 year olds 
(Year 10)

  • Jan

    I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith

  • Feb

    Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee

    GSCE preparation text

  • Mar

    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell  

    GCSE preparation text

  • Apr

    Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson 

    LGBT Month 

  • May

    Hitler's Willing Executioners by Daniel Goldhagen 

  • Jun

    Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift

  • Jul

    Schindler's Ark by Thomas Keneally

  • Aug

    The Fellowship of the Ring by JRR Tolkien

  • Sep

    Tinker, Tailor Soldier, Spy by John Le Carre

  • Oct

    Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie

  • Nov

    All Quite on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque 

    Remembrance Day is on the 11th November

  • Dec

    The Road by Cormac McCarthy 

    A Christmas treat of a read.

  • A thought provoking and emotive autobiography which cohonicales the first part of the Nelson Mandelas's life, leading tup to his tie in captivity. An examination of the triumph of human spirit over adversity 

    Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela

  • 13 year old Briony Tallis stumbles upon something shocking which sets off a series of events in a downward spiral and life changing crime. Can Briony every put the pieces back tighter?

    Atonement by Ian McEwan 

  • The life of Pip is explored in this timeless saga filled with  unique and memorable characters about one boy's self discovery and drive to become a man, despite unremitting adversity.

    Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

  • A gripping, yet peculiar, story about a man who is released form prison and meets a man who claims to be a godlike King of America. Together, they start to solve murders, sort problems, and make a country great by telling everyone what they want to hear. The climax builds with storm of biblical proportions. 

    American Gods by Neil Gaiman

  • A downtrodden orphan thinks her life has changed for the better after meeting Maxim de Winter in the South of France in a whirlwind romance. But moving to Cornwall reveals an unexpected ghost.  

    Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

  • The Joad family follow their dreams and head to the West Coast of America. Things don't go well for them. A classic in American Fiction exploring characters, raw emotions: with many parallels to broken society today.

    The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

  • A must read SYFY novel. After a devastating world war, Rick Deckard, a ruthless bounty hunter, takes an assignment to beat all other s. Promised a huge reward, he soon finds himself in a bad dream of lies, plots and treachery.

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick

  • A modern classic exploring the world of introverted teenager Gene who lives out WW2 at boarding school and his polar opposite Phineas who is both carefree and dangerous. 

    A Separate Peace by John Knowles

  • 13 year old Briony Tallis stumbles upon something shocking which sets off a series of events in a downward spiral and life changing crime. Can Briony every put the pieces back tighter?

    Atonement by Ian McEwan 

  • Told as a series of flashbacks, Kathy tried to make sense of her childhood at the seemingly perfect Hailsham School. The story slowly reveals a shocking dystopia which forces the reader to confront the horrors of modern society. 

    Never Let me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

If you intend to take an exam in English, here are the books you should be reading this year!

 

  • Withering Heights by Emily Bronte

  • Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

  • Rebecca by Daphne De Maurier

  • The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

  • Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee

  • 1983 by George Orwell

  • Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift

  • Schindler's Ark by Thomas Keneally

  • Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson

  • Midnights Children by Salman Rushdie

Why read these books?

These books are the cornerstones of the school library. Every book you read after, every book you read in preparation for an exam and every book you read for the exam will make the assumption that you have read these. Story tellers refer back to the books they have read, those references are easy to spot in their work and to understand. These books are the past statements on what it is to be human and what it is be human in a particular culture. Each book builds upon the last read. When you are not in the know, when you miss the references and miss the allusions - basically you not in the conversation!

If, like me, you are dyslexic, a lot of these books are going to be a tough read. Best way forward is to listen to these on audio book in the unabridged format. Let somebody else do the decoding for you, whilst you listen carefully to the story line and the complex themes. 

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